Feminist Last Naming Practices

Nontraditional Last Name Stories

2013 Annotated Bibliography

Latino Double Surnames

Algevis, Nelson. 2012. Those Ridiculously Long Latino Names. Journal of College Admissions. 215: 3.
http://0-search.ebscohost.com.tiger.coloradocollege.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=74258752

Queer Surnames
Almack, K. (2005). What’s in a Name? The Significance of the Choice of Surnames Given to Children Born within Lesbian-parent Families. Sexualities 8:39 (241-254).

Clarke, Victoria; Burns, Maree; Burgoyne, Carole. (2008). ‘Who would take whose name?’ Accounts of naming practices in same-sex relationships. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology 18, 420-439.
Qualitative study of how 30 same-sex couples made meaning of name changing and keeping. One subject changed her last name, some though of doing it in the future, and most had no plans to change their last names.
Clarke(2008).pdf

Hequembourg, A. & Farrell, M. (1999). Lesbian Motherhood: Negotiating Marginal Mainstream Identities. Gender & Society 13:540 (540-557).

*** Suter, E. A. & Oswald, R. F. (2003). Do Lesbians Change Their Last Names in the Context of a Committed Relationship? Journal of Lesbian Studies (7) 2.

History
Basch, Francoise. (1986). Women’s rights and the wrongs of marriage in mid-nineteenth-century America. History Workshop 22,18-40.
Basch.pdf

Scheuble, Laurie K. and David R. Johnson. (1995). Women’s marital naming in two generations: a national study. Journal of Marriage and Family 57, 724-732.
Looks at a group of women and compares their thoughts to their married, adult offspring.
Scheuble(1995).pdf

Stone, Linda. 2010 4th ed. Kinship and Gender. Boulder: Westview.
Almost nothing on naming but good overview on patrilineality (patrilineal bias 172-3; patrilineal ideology 239-40; the “matrilineal puzzle,”

Children
Johnson, David R. 2002. “What should we call our kids? Choosing children’s surnames when parents’ last names differ.” The Social Science Journal, 39(3), 419-429.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362331902002033
Examines naming trends of 600 women, includes stats and charts
Practice of including mother’s maiden name in child’s name (as first or middle)
“Our study focuses on the prevalence of gendered surname choices by examining children’s middle and surnames in a probability sample of 600 married women selected to over-represent those who kept their birth name, hyphenated their last name with that of their husband, or made some other unconventional last name choice.” (Abstract)

Liss, Miriam and Mindy J. Erchull. Differences in beliefs and behaviors between feminist actual and anticipated mothers. (2013). Psycholgy of Women Quarterly 37(3), 381-391
Discusses the transition to parenthood and surrounding attitudes and behaviors, including naming and professionalism.
Liss and Erchul.pdf

Nugent, Colleen. (2010) Children’s Surnames, Moral Dilemmas: Accounting for the Predominance of Fathers’ Surnames for Children. Gender & Society, 24, 499-522.
Interesting survery of online (forums, discussion sites) responses to the questions of non-traditional naming practices. Discusses the gendered dichotomy that reinforces a system of inequality as being represented by an expectation for women to take their husband’s name. Discusses tension between a woman’s sense of self and their commitment to family/society/spouse, etc. (Does exclude same-sex couples, so maybe not a great source for everybody) Has some very strong-opinioned voices in it regarding women being “selfish” for not taking their husbands name/children getting father’s names.

“Keepers”- Retention of Maiden Name
Conrad-Rice, Joy Belle. (1973). The legal status of a married woman’s maiden name. Women’s Law Journal 59, 98-102.
Conrad-Rice.pdf

Goldin, Claudia and Maria Shim. (2004). Making a name: Women’s surnames at marriage and beyond. Journal of Economic Perspective 18 (2), 143-160.
Seeks factors that prompted women to keep their own last names upon marriage.
Goldin and Shim.pdf

Gooding, G. and Kreider, R. (2010). Women’s Marital Naming Choices in a Nationally Representative Sample. Journal of Family Issues 31:681 (681-701).
National overview of marital name changing, statistically based. Found 6% nonconventional surnames among native-born women. Might be good for statistical analyses (Gracie?).

Hoffnung, M. (2006). What’s In a Name? Marital Name Choice Revisited. Sex Roles, 55(11-12), 817-825.
Good survey of practices; still doesn’t address efficacy of feminist/non-traditional, or what children should do.
Hoffnung.WhatsInName.pdf

Kopelman, Richard E., Fossen, Rita J. Shea-Van, Paraskevas, Eletherios, Lawter, Leanna, Prottas, David J. (2009). The bride is keeping her name: a 35-year retrospective analysis of trends and correlates. Social Behavior and Personality 37(5), 687-700.
Looked at NYTimes wedding announcement to analyze 9 hypotheses
Brides will increasingly keep their names and then plataue
Brides with higher level professional positions will keep their name more than those in lower levels
Brides with a graduate degree are more likely to keep maiden name
Older brides more likely to keep surname
Religious ceremonies cause less women to keep names
Religious ceremony with 2+ officiants of diff faiths more likely to keep last name
Brides with deceased parents more likely to keep last name
Divorced parents= bride more likely to keep maiden name
Alone in wedding announcement pic= more likely to keep last name
Kopelman.pdf

“Changers”- to married name
Hammond, Percy. 1925. “Do You Use Your Husband’s Name?” Liberty Magazine, January 17, 45.
http://www.alicemariebeard.com/law/1925.htm

This magazine article was written at the advent of the Lucy Stone League, a group of feminists who fought against patrilineal naming practices and the use of “Mrs.” The article outlines the reasoning behind the movement (led by Ruth Hale) and elaborates on the difficulties many “Stoners” (women who keep their maiden names) face. Ultimately, this article can serve as an interesting comparison between attitudes toward non-patrilineal naming practices in the 1920s and now. Seemingly, more has stayed the same than changed.

Herron, Melissann. (2010). Patronymy as Taken-for-Granted and Enforced Patriarchal Practice? Analysis of Marital Naming Practices and Plans. San Diego State University Thesis. Available
http://sdsu-dspace.calstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10211.10/351/Herron_Melissann.pdf?sequence=1
Extensive and exhaustive thesis on marital name changing. Includes information on background of naming changing, social implications and reactions, and extensive analysis of reasons women change or keep their names. Includes qualitative questionnaire based study.

Feminism
Cott, Nancy F. (1989). What’s in a name? The limits of “social feminism”; or, expanding the vocabulary of women’s history. The Journal of American History, Vol. 76(3), 809-829.
Cott.pdf

Harris, Sharon M. (1999). Feminist Theories and early American studies. Early American Literature 34, 86-93.
Harris.pdf
Mendes, K. (2011). ‘The lady is a closet feminist!’ Discourses of backlash and postfeminism in British and American newspapers. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(549), 549-566.
Mendes questions the notion that “feminism is dead/no longer necessary”, or postfeminist and backlash, discourse is recent. Though often used interchangeably, this article defines post-feminist to mean “we no longer need feminism” and backlash to mean that “feminism has gone too far” and hurts people. She analyzes the use of “feminism is dead/no longer necessary” in four prominent British and American newspapers in the 1960s-1980s, and discovers its discourse long before the waning of second wave feminism. American newspapers often described feminist concerns as legitimite, but unfortunately backed by an illegitimate movement. British newspapers focused more on the idea that women already had equal rights and that the movement is irrelevant. Newspapers of both countries either partook in or chronicled a backlash against second wave feminism, for example, the U.S. “feminists are hurting our families” discourse. Mendes concludes by saying that “feminism is dead” discourse has been around since the beginning of feminism. This article gives great insight to the cross-cultural similarities and differences between U.S. and British backlash and dismissal of feminism. (Kobsa-Mark– sorry, the annotated bibliographies from last block were super long, so I got used to it)

Mills, S. (2003). Caught between sexism, anti-sexism and ‘political correctness’: feminist women’s negotiations with naming practices. Discourse & Society, 14(1), 87-110.
Survey; how distinct from sampling more ethnographically, with attention to context? Do we want to do stats, at least on prevalence in our sample? (No). Why, or why not?
Mills.pdf

Ridge, C. (2008). Voluntary Choices and Feminism: Names, Naming and Community. Conference Papers — Midwestern Political Science Association, 1-27.
Some good background, but presumes such a thing as a “good feminist choice” at all; emphasis on voluntary choices (choice theory); cherry-picked cross-cultural stuff; good foil for actual ethnography.

Identity
Boxer, Diana and Elena Gritsenko. (2005) Women and Surnames Across Cultures: Reconstituting Identity in Marriage. Women and Language 28(2):1-11.

Downe, Pamela. 2001. Playing with Names: How Children Create Identities of Self in Anthropological Research. Canadian Anthropology Society. 43(2), 165-177.
Cool article- maybe not super relavent to feminism but definitely applies to understanding of how children/individual’s develop a sense of self and IDENTITY through names.
Examines construction of self in two young female children through their name/names- both given and self-created. Discusses this tendency as a way for children to become active participatents as opposed to passive recepients of names, identities, and cultural understanding.

Hamilton, Laura, Claudia Geist, and Brian Powel (2011). Marital Name Changes as a Window into Gender Attitudes. Gender and Society 20(10):1-31.
Explores viewpoints on gender through opinions on alternative last naming practices

Hamilton, Laura, Geist, Claudia, and Brian Powell. (2011). Marital name change as a window into gender attitudes. Gender & Society 25(2), 145-175

Intons-Peterson, Margaret J. and Jill Crawford (1985). The Meaning of Marital Surnames. Sex Roles 12(11/12):1163-1171.

Jacquette, Dale (2011). Frege on Identity as a Relation of Names. Metaphysica 12(1):51-72.

Jeshion, Robin (2009). The Significance of Names. Mind and Language 24(4):370-403.

Miller, Nathan (1927). Some Aspects of the Name in Culture-History. American Journal of
Sociology 32(4):585-600.

Rosensaft, Michael (2002). The Right of Men to Change Their Names Upon Marriage. Journal of Constitutional Law 5(1):186-218.

Scheuble, Laurie and David R. Johnson (1993) Marital Name Change: Plans and Attitudes of College Students. Journal of Marriage and Family 55(3):747-754.

Schmit, G. and J. Eutrope (2012). Transmission dans la famille: transmission du nom, mythe familial et construction de l’identité. Neuropsychiatrie de l’enfance et de l’adolescence 60:243-247.

Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund (2013). The Name Change Project. Accessed 10/7/13.
http://www.transgenderlegal.org/work_show.php?id=7

Twenge, J. (1997) Mrs. His Name. Psychology of Women Quarterly 21: 417-429
Twenge. Mrs. His Name.pdf

Legal
Emens, Elizabeth. 2007. Changing Name Changing: Framing Rules and the Future of Marital Names. The University of Chicago Law Review. 74(3): 761-863.

Rosensaft, Michael. 2002. The Right of Men to Change their Names Upon Marriage. Journal of Consitutional Law 5(1):

Misc.
Faludi, Susan. (1991). Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women. New York: Three Rivers Press.
Gives insight to the series of backlashes that occurred in response to the Second Wave Feminist Movement. Elaborates on the role of the media in reinforcing this backlash.

Owen Blakemore, Judith E., Lawton, Carol A., and Lesa Rae Vartanian. (2005). I can’t wait to get married: Gender differences in drive to marry. Sex Roles 53(5/6), 327- 335.
Mostly about an innovative construct – the Drive to Marry (DTM). Also delves into womens’ professionalism and ideas surrounding traditionalism.
OwenBlakemore.2005.CantWaitMarry.pdf

Scheuble, Laurie and David R. Johnson. (1993) Marital name change: plans and attitudes of college students. Journal of Marriage and Family 55(3):747-754
While a large majority of college students plan to stick with the traditional patrilineal naming strategy, women, more than men, are accepting of alternative strategies. Pretty unsurprising stuff, but it does provide statistical analysis on the topic

Scheuble, Laurie K. and David R. Johnson. (1995). Women’s marital naming in two generations: a national study. Journal of Marriage and Family 57, 724-732.
Looks at a group of women and compares their thoughts to their married, adult offspring.
Scheuble(1995).pdf

Scheuble, Laurie K., Johnson, David R. and Katherine M. Johnson. (2012). Marital name changing attitudes and plans of college students: Comparing change over time and across regions. Sex Roles 66, 282-292.
Investigates college aged womens’ attitudes on name changing from 1990-2006 and from the midwest to the east.
Scheuble(2012).pdf

Sykes, Bryan (2001). The Seven Daughters of Eve. W. W. Norton. ISBN 0-393-02018_5, pp. 291-92.
Sykes discusses the difficulty in genealogically tracing a maternal lineage, due to the lack of matrilineal surnames (or matrinames).

Hyphenated Names
Forbes, Gordon B et al. 2002. Preceptions of Married Women and Married Men with hyphenated surnames. Sex Roles. 46 (5/6): 167-176
http://0-search.ebscohost.com.tiger.coloradocollege.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=7401548
Percevied BY 197 Euro-American college students
On average, the woman with a hyphenated name was perceived as more friendly, good-natured, industrious, intellectually curious, well educated and as more likely to havea career.
Men with hyphenated surnames were also perceived as accommodating and goodnatured, and viewed as being both nurturing and committed to their marriage.
Women and men with hyphenated names were generally perceived as having higher levels of both instrumental and expressive traits than other married people.
The results suggestthat college students have generally positive perceptions of married people with hyphenated names.

Scheuble, Laurie K. and Johnson, David R. (2005) Married women’s situational use of last names: an empirical study. Sex Roles 53, 143-151
Women using different last names in different situations, such as professional situations. Most were found using situational last names in hyphenating situations.
Scheuble2005.pdf

Professionalism
Owen Blakemore, Judith E., Lawton, Carol A., and Lesa Rae Vartanian. (2005). I can’t wait to get married: Gender differences in drive to marry. Sex Roles 53(5/6), 327- 335.
Mostly about an innovative construct – the Drive to Marry (DTM). Also delves into womens’ professionalism and ideas surrounding traditionalism.
OwenBlakemore.2005.CantWaitMarry.pdf

Scheuble, Laurie K. and Johnson, David R. (2005) Married women’s situational use of last names: an empirical study. Sex Roles 53, 143-151
Women using different last names in different situations, such as professional situations. Most were found using situational last names in hyphenating situations.
Scheuble2005.pdf

Future Plans
Scheuble, Laurie and David R. Johnson. (1993) Marital name change: plans and attitudes of college students. Journal of Marriage and Family 55(3):747-754
While a large majority of college students plan to stick with the traditional patrilineal naming strategy, women, more than men, are accepting of alternative strategies. Pretty unsurprising stuff, but it does provide statistical analysis on the topic

Scheuble, Laurie K., Johnson, David R. and Katherine M. Johnson. (2012). Marital name changing attitudes and plans of college students: Comparing change over time and across regions. Sex Roles 66, 282-292.
Investigates college aged womens’ attitudes on name changing from 1990-2006 and from the midwest to the east.
Scheuble(2012).pdf

Views on Mulitple Naming Strategies
2012. “Take My Name. Please!” Huffpost Live. http://live.huffingtonpost.com/r/segment/can-a-feminist-take/5049fdd32b8c2a5518000092
Huff Post Live conversation between a co-host who is getting married (and doesn’t know whether to keep her last name or change it), a Reverend who kept her maiden name, a newlywed who took her husband’s name, a woman who hyphenated, and a male co-host who feels “modern man” guilt over his wife taking his last name
Mentions:
Can a feminist take her husband’s name
The legacy/permanency of keeping one’s maiden name
Along with it’s hassle
Always have to explain
People don’t always think you’re related to the rest of your family
Can’t get away from the patriarchy (your maiden name’s just your father’s name)
Hyphenating Names
Is this sustainable
The hassle that comes with length
One woman solely gave her daughter her husband’s name even though hers was hyphenated because the mother’s maident name isn’t the daughter’s maiden name
Taking the husband’s name
To honor the husband’s family
As a form of trust in the relationship
Creates family ties
Proves that you’re “really” married i.e. not having children out of wedlock or just living together and “playing” marriage
Men’s views on women taking/not taking their last name
Modern man guilt at wife taking husband’s name

Wood, Megan. 2013. “When the New You Carries a Fresh Identity, Too.“ New York Times, February 15.
A positive media evaluation of women who pursue nontraditional (or traditional) naming practices after their marriage.

Men
Rosensaft, Michael. 2002. The Right of Men to Change their Names Upon Marriage. Journal of Consitutional Law 5(1):

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